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    Beat It (Demo)

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    The Ultimate Fan Extras Collection

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    Michael Jackson

liamdryden:

peterberkman:

lacienegasmiled:

As Jackson couldn’t fluently play any instruments, he would sing and beatbox out how he wanted his songs to sound by himself on tape, layering the vocals, harmonies and rhythm before having instrumentalists come in to complete the songs.

One of his engineers Robmix on how Jackson worked: “One morning MJ came in with a new song he had written overnight. We called in a guitar player, and Michael sang every note of every chord to him. “here’s the first chord first note, second note, third note. Here’s the second chord first note, second note, third note”, etc., etc. We then witnessed him giving the most heartfelt and profound vocal performance, live in the control room through an SM57. He would sing us an entire string arrangement, every part. Steve Porcaro once told me he witnessed MJ doing that with the string section in the room. Had it all in his head, harmony and everything. Not just little eight bar loop ideas. he would actually sing the entire arrangement into a micro-cassette recorder complete with stops and fills.”

Reasons why I laugh when people say he wasn’t a real musician.

ohhhh my fuck

wohooowwww

(Source: harrattanparhar)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Andreas Franke

Austrian photographer and deep sea diving enthusiast Andreas Franke has released a new series titled Stavronikita Project: The Life Above Refined Below being exhibited deep at the bottom of the Caribbean right off the coast of Barbados. It was less than two years ago that the adventurous photographer first introduced his idea of an underwater gallery, at 130 ft. deep, with his photography affixed to the sunken USS General Hoyt S. Vandenberg ship. This new exhibit, though similar in its approach, offers a new set of surreal images to view by diving undersea.

Franke’s latest project explores the decadent lifestyle of the wealthy during the Rococo era as it is juxtaposed with the decaying freight ship and swarming marine life as its backdrop. The Viennese artist uses images of his models imitating the period of opulent abundance as a contrasting visual to his deep sea captures of the SS Stavronikita, creating an intriguing image rich with interpretation. Like his previous work, Stavronikita is on display underwater, behind a plane of plexiglas, sealed in with silicone and a steel frame and attached to the ship with strong magnets. The exhibit can currently be seen, at a depth of 80 ft., through April 2013.

http://www.thesinkingworld.com/#

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Sinking-World-of-Andreas-Franke/365703096857567

http://www.mymodernmet.com/profiles/blogs/andreas-franke-stavronikita-project-the-life-above-refined-below

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